Updates

Engineering

System 001 Assembly Completed

After six months of assembly, we can now announce that System 001 is officially complete. It is currently positioned entirely in the Seaplane Lagoon – the sheltered body of water adjacent our assembly yard in Alameda. The cleanup system will make tow with the Maersk Launcher at Anchorage 9 on September 7th, the morning before the...

Read more
General, Engineering

The Final Design of the World's First Cleanup System

On May 11th, 2017 we unveiled our new method to clean up the world's ocean garbage patches. Instead of having one massive cleanup system fixed to the seabed, we unveiled a plan where we would instead deploy a fleet of many smaller, free-floating systems. To be able to passively collect the plastic, we came up with the idea to suspend a...

Read more
Engineering, Testing

Successful Tow Test Validates System 001 Seaworthiness

On May 19th, from our assembly yard in Alameda, a 120-meter section of our cleanup system was towed out of San Francisco Bay and into the Pacific to conduct a tow test. We are happy to report that the entire section performed satisfactorily. Of the minor issues that the screen did endure, most were identified during earlier...

Read more
General, Engineering

System 001 Assembly: 120-meter Tow Test Unit Completed

To meet our ambitious goals of deploying the first ocean cleanup system this summer, we are reminded of one of our basic design principles here at The Ocean Cleanup: doing is the fastest way of learning. In less than five weeks, we progressed from signing the lease for an empty assembly yard in Alameda, California to a fully active...

Read more
Testing, Engineering

Looking Back on our Most Advanced Scale Model Test to Date

Before we share some great news on the System 001 assembly front, we wanted to provide you with an update on our recent scale model tests, the most advanced we have conducted so far. Why test You might be wondering why we are still testing and simultaneously building our system. This comes down to our iterative design process....

Read more
General, Engineering, Testing

Unscheduled Learning Opportunities on the North Sea

A new ocean cleanup prototype is being deployed on the North Sea today. It is one of the last steps as we prepare to launch the first cleanup system in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch this summer. To understand how we arrived at this point, here is a brief history of the North Sea prototypes, and the reasons why we're deploying another...

Read more
Testing, Engineering

New North Sea prototype successfully deployed

Moving towards the deployment of our first cleanup system in mid-2018, The Ocean Cleanup continues to test and verify system components. On August 29 we deployed the first part our new North Sea prototype. The new North Sea tests are aimed at assessing two variations of floater-screen connections as well as the application of antifouling...

Read more
Testing, Engineering

Second North Sea Prototype to be tested in August

Our first cleanup system is scheduled to be deployed by mid-2018; less than 10 months from now. The Ocean Cleanup team is now moving full speed ahead towards execution, but in parallel continues to test parts of the system to maximize the chances of success. While production of the full-length floater is underway in California, the...

Read more
Testing, Engineering

The Testing Continues

Sticking to its planning, The Ocean Cleanup team is working hard on its long-term goal to initiate the full-scale cleanup of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by 2020. To ensure optimization of our technology, we test and evaluate the barriers’ capability and survivability in multiple ways. Among others, we investigate how the...

Read more
Testing, Engineering

An update from the North Sea

During a recent inspection of the North Sea prototype we noticed something unusual: the two outermost air chambers seemed to be bent out of shape - they did not follow the gentle U-shape of the boom. Thanks to underwater footage we were quickly able to diagnose the problem. It turns out the problem was caused by failing shackles –...

Read more