Updates

Research

Remote Sensing of Ocean Plastics

Today, our results on the analysis of hyperspectral imagery collected during our 2016 Aerial Expedition above the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) were published in the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology, authored by Shungudzemwoyo Garaba* et al. Earlier this year we presented our results of several...

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Oceanography, Research, General

The Exponential Increase of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

After three years of research including two field expeditions, extensive laboratory experiments and data analyses, we are thrilled to finally release the results of our study on the infamous Great Pacific Garbage Patch or GPGP. Our peer-reviewed manuscript published today in the journal Scientific Reports summarizes the methodology that...

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Oceanography, Research

How Ocean Plastics Turn into a Dangerous Meal

Our research team has just published a new article in the journal Environmental Science and Technology revealing that plastics within the Great Pacific Garbage Patch are loaded with pollutants at levels that may be high enough to harm organisms ingesting them. This is particularly concerning when considering the high plastic exposure we...

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Research, Oceanography

Investigating Plastic Detection from Space

After almost 3 years of work, The Ocean Cleanup research team has recently submitted its comprehensive results about plastic pollution in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. More than 1.2 million pieces of plastic have been collected, counted, sorted, characterised and categorised. Terabytes of aerial images and data have been...

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Team, Research

Dr. Richard Spinrad Joins The Ocean Cleanup’s Scientific Advisory Board

The Ocean Cleanup is honored to welcome former NOAA Chief Scientist Dr. Richard (Rick) Spinrad as the newest member of our Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). In his advisory role, Dr. Spinrad will focus on challenging our work and designs based on his extensive experience in oceanography and the maritime technology field. His role will...

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Research

Quantifying global plastic inputs from rivers into oceans

Quantifying plastic pollution in the world’s ocean requires a good understanding of sources. It is commonly accepted that most plastic found in or near the marine environment is coming from land-based sources. Rivers particularly may play an important role in transporting mismanaged plastic waste from land into the ocean. Our...

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Research

Understanding the rising speed of plastic

The Ocean Cleanup Research Team continues to analyze data from our expeditions, including our Mega Expedition which provided us with the largest sample of ocean plastic ever collected (1.1 million particles weighing approximately one ton). One of the many experiments conducted was measuring the rising speed of plastic...

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Oceanography, Research

Ocean Plastic Mostly Near Surface, Study Shows

It is a commonly held belief that plastic pollution is spread from ocean surface to seabed. Our newest study, published today in Nature Scientific Reports, shows that at least for buoyant plastic bigger than a sand grain (0.5mm), this is not the case, primarily residing on or near the surface. It also reveals that conventional methods to...

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Oceanography, Research

The Ocean Cleanup Aerial expedition: mission update

The Aerial Expedition is about to begin! In a few days we will start conducting visual surveys, supplemented with state-of-art sensors to quantify the biggest and most harmful type of marine debris: ghost nets. It is the most important missing piece of the puzzle remaining after last year’s Mega Expedition. On September 26, our...

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Research

Announcing the Aerial Expedition

We are proud to announce The Ocean Cleanup’s next major research mission: the Aerial Expedition. In September and October 2016, we will conduct a series of low-speed, low-altitude flights across the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in a C-130 Hercules aircraft, using expert spotters and state-of-the-art sensors. Our aim is to accurately...

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